School: Science

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Introductory Computer Forensics
  • Unit Code

    CSG5126
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    1
  • Version

    2
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
    Online
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Mr Patryk Sebastian SZEWCZYK

Description

This unit introduces students to the forensic tools, techniques and methods needed to recover digital evidence from a variety of devices. Modern forensic computing involves the preservation, identification and analysis of computer and digital based evidence stored in the form of magnetically encoded information on various devices and media. Computer or digital evidence is often not examinable by conventional computing access methods, so specialised software tools, techniques and processes must be employed to preserve and recover this evidence in a forensically valid manner.

Equivalent Rule

Unit was previously coded CSG4106, CSG5183

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Analyse and report on data recovered using forensic methods.
  2. Apply digital forensic tools and techniques to recover data from various sources in a forensically sound manner.
  3. Communicate digital forensic issues and related policy associated with computer networks, telecommunications and distributed systems.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of digital forensic procedures and methodologies.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the current legal and ethical positions that relate to digital forensics.
  6. Evaluate the scientific method and its application to digital forensics.
  7. Execute preliminary research into forensic computing issues using scientifically valid methods.
  8. Investigate current digital forensics issues.

Unit Content

  1. Current issues in forensic computing.
  2. Data acquisition and recovery.
  3. Ethical and legal issues of forensic computing application.
  4. Forensic computing evidence recovery tools and techniques.
  5. Forensic validation of results.
  6. Future issues and trends.
  7. Physical, environmental and organisational considerations for deploying forensic computing initiatives.
  8. The forensic process and method.

Teaching and Learning Processes

Lectures, workshops, case studies, and online resources.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
WorkshopAssessable workshops20%
Case StudyForensic investigation case study30%
Examination ^End of semester examination50%
ONLINE
TypeDescriptionValue
WorkshopAssessable workshops20%
Case StudyForensic investigation case study30%
Examination ^End of semester examination50%

^ Mandatory to Pass


Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

CSG5126|2|1

School: Science

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Introductory Computer Forensics
  • Unit Code

    CSG5126
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    2
  • Version

    2
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
    Online
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Dr Patryk Sebastian SZEWCZYK

Description

This unit introduces students to the forensic tools, techniques and methods needed to recover digital evidence from a variety of devices. Modern forensic computing involves the preservation, identification and analysis of computer and digital based evidence stored in the form of magnetically encoded information on various devices and media. Computer or digital evidence is often not examinable by conventional computing access methods, so specialised software tools, techniques and processes must be employed to preserve and recover this evidence in a forensically valid manner.

Equivalent Rule

Unit was previously coded CSG4106, CSG5183

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Analyse and report on data recovered using forensic methods.
  2. Apply digital forensic tools and techniques to recover data from various sources in a forensically sound manner.
  3. Communicate digital forensic issues and related policy associated with computer networks, telecommunications and distributed systems.
  4. Demonstrate an understanding of digital forensic procedures and methodologies.
  5. Demonstrate an understanding of the current legal and ethical positions that relate to digital forensics.
  6. Evaluate the scientific method and its application to digital forensics.
  7. Execute preliminary research into forensic computing issues using scientifically valid methods.
  8. Investigate current digital forensics issues.

Unit Content

  1. Current issues in forensic computing.
  2. Data acquisition and recovery.
  3. Ethical and legal issues of forensic computing application.
  4. Forensic computing evidence recovery tools and techniques.
  5. Forensic validation of results.
  6. Future issues and trends.
  7. Physical, environmental and organisational considerations for deploying forensic computing initiatives.
  8. The forensic process and method.

Teaching and Learning Processes

Lectures, workshops, case studies, and online resources.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
WorkshopAssessable workshop10%
Case StudyForensic investigation case study40%
Examination ^End of semester examination50%
ONLINE
TypeDescriptionValue
WorkshopAssessable workshop10%
Case StudyForensic investigation case study40%
Examination ^End of semester examination50%

^ Mandatory to Pass

Core Reading(s)

  • Nelson, B., Phillips, A., & Steuart, C. (2015). Guide to computer forensics and investigations. (5th ed.). Boston: Course Technology.

Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

CSG5126|2|2