School: Science

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Computer Security
  • Unit Code

    CSI1101
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    1
  • Version

    1
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
    Online
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Dr Patryk Sebastian SZEWCZYK

Description

This unit covers the threats to computer systems and the countermeasures that can be put in place to minimise them. The areas covered are: aims of computer security and general computer security threats, malicious code including viruses, trojan horses, worms and other forms of hostile executable code. Students also consider the history and fundamental concepts of encryption, current encryption techniques and the social issues that surround the use of such techniques.

Equivalent Rule

Unit was previously coded CSI2201, CSI4102, CSI5122

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Discuss the aims of computer security and analyse security breaching attacks in the context of these aims.
  2. Explain the history of encryption and the application of current forms of encryption, their role in society and the issues that surround their use.
  3. Explainthe range of surveillance techniques and countermeasures.
  4. Identify a range of network and Internet related security issues including current types of attacks and appropriate countermeasures.
  5. Investigate a range of security issues relating to operating systems and PC systems.
  6. Outlineand develop the skills required to stay informed of current security issues as new attacks and countermeasures continue to be reported.

Unit Content

  1. Aims of computer security; computer abuse and misuse.
  2. Current attacks and vulnerabilities including denial of service attacks.
  3. Current cryptographic techniques and technologies.
  4. Eavesdropping techniques and countermeasures.
  5. Encryption fundamentals, including the history of cryptographic techniques and cryptanalysis.
  6. Encryption techniques used for ensuring authenticity, integrity, non-repudiation and copy-protection.
  7. Identification, Authentication and Authorisation including passwords, smartcards and biometrics.
  8. Internet and E-commerce security issues.
  9. Malicious and hostile code including viruses, trojan horses, worms, backdoors, trapdoors and spyware.
  10. Network security including firewalls.
  11. Operating system security, models of security and security evaluation criteria.
  12. PC security including current security tools.

Teaching and Learning Processes

Lectures, workshops and sets of self-assessment questions.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
TestReview test5%
ReportReport on contemporary computer security issues20%
AssignmentInvestigation into computer security countermeasures25%
Examination ^End of semester examination50%
ONLINE
TypeDescriptionValue
TestReview test5%
ReportReport on contemporary computer security issues20%
AssignmentInvestigation into computer security countermeasures25%
Examination ^End of semester examination50%

^ Mandatory to Pass


Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

CSI1101|1|1

School: Science

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Computer Security
  • Unit Code

    CSI1101
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    2
  • Version

    1
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
    Online
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Dr Patryk Sebastian SZEWCZYK

Description

This unit covers the threats to computer systems and the countermeasures that can be put in place to minimise them. The areas covered are: aims of computer security and general computer security threats, malicious code including viruses, trojan horses, worms and other forms of hostile executable code. Students also consider the history and fundamental concepts of encryption, current encryption techniques and the social issues that surround the use of such techniques.

Equivalent Rule

Unit was previously coded CSI2201, CSI4102, CSI5122

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Discuss the aims of computer security and analyse security breaching attacks in the context of these aims.
  2. Explain the history of encryption and the application of current forms of encryption, their role in society and the issues that surround their use.
  3. Explainthe range of surveillance techniques and countermeasures.
  4. Identify a range of network and Internet related security issues including current types of attacks and appropriate countermeasures.
  5. Investigate a range of security issues relating to operating systems and PC systems.
  6. Outlineand develop the skills required to stay informed of current security issues as new attacks and countermeasures continue to be reported.

Unit Content

  1. Aims of computer security; computer abuse and misuse.
  2. Current attacks and vulnerabilities including denial of service attacks.
  3. Current cryptographic techniques and technologies.
  4. Eavesdropping techniques and countermeasures.
  5. Encryption fundamentals, including the history of cryptographic techniques and cryptanalysis.
  6. Encryption techniques used for ensuring authenticity, integrity, non-repudiation and copy-protection.
  7. Identification, Authentication and Authorisation including passwords, smartcards and biometrics.
  8. Internet and E-commerce security issues.
  9. Malicious and hostile code including viruses, trojan horses, worms, backdoors, trapdoors and spyware.
  10. Network security including firewalls.
  11. Operating system security, models of security and security evaluation criteria.
  12. PC security including current security tools.

Teaching and Learning Processes

Lectures, workshops and sets of self-assessment questions.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
TestReview test5%
ReportReport on contemporary computer security issues20%
AssignmentInvestigation into computer security countermeasures25%
Examination ^End of semester examination50%
ONLINE
TypeDescriptionValue
TestReview test5%
ReportReport on contemporary computer security issues20%
AssignmentInvestigation into computer security countermeasures25%
Examination ^End of semester examination50%

^ Mandatory to Pass

Core Reading(s)

  • Stallings, W., & Brown, L. (2015). Computer Security Principles and Practice. (3rd ed.). Essex, CM: Pearson.

Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

CSI1101|1|2