School: Engineering

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Computer Fundamentals
  • Unit Code

    ENS1161
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    1
  • Version

    2
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
    Online
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Dr Wlodzimierz GORNISIEWICZ

Description

This unit presents fundamental topics in discrete mathematics that are essential to computing studies including logic, Boolean algebra and logic circuits, set theory, counting techniques, computer arithmetic, graph theory and matrix algebra with applications to computing. It also provides an introduction to the representation of numbers in a computer, and assembly language programming for a microprocessor.

Equivalent Rule

Unit was previously coded ENS4103

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Convert integers and fractions between decimal, octal, binary and hexadecimal number systems; perform simple arithmetic in these systems.
  2. Find sums and products of matrices; apply the algebra of matrices to simple exercises in computer graphics and cryptography.
  3. Identify isomorphic graphs and planar graphs; use matrix representation of graphs; identify Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs.
  4. Represent relations using graphs, ordered pairs and directed graphs; identify equivalence relations; use modular arithmetic; use function notation; identify onto and one-to-one functions; use composition of functions; find the inverse of a function.
  5. Use 2s complement representation of integers; interpret addition operations using CCR flags; perform BCD addition; use ASCII codes.
  6. Use Boolean algebra and Karnaugh maps to simplify Boolean expressions; design, analyse and/or simplify logic circuits.
  7. Use set operations and Venn diagrams; apply elementary counting techniques.
  8. Use the laws of propositional logic to simplify or analyse compound propositions; use truth tables to establish logical equivalence and validity of arguments.

Unit Content

  1. Addition and multiplication of matrices; transpose; zero and identity matrices; laws of matrix algebra; inverse of a square matrix; finding determinant and inverse of 22 matrix; application of matrices to computer graphics and cryptography.
  2. Boolean algebra; logic gates; Karnaugh maps; simplification of Boolean expressions; design and simplification of logic circuits; universality of NANDs.
  3. Computer representation of integers; addition and interpretation using CCR flags; addition of BCD numbers; ASCII code.
  4. Decimal, octal, binary and hexadecimal number systems and conversions of integers and fractions; arithmetic in these systems.
  5. Null and complete graphs, complements; isomorphic graphs; matrix representation of graphs; planar graphs; Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs.
  6. Propositions, connectives and truth tables; logical equivalence; laws of logic; arguments; predicate logic.
  7. Relations and their representations; equivalence relations and classes; modular arithmetic; application to cryptography. Function as process, function as relation; onto and one-to-one functions; composition and inverse functions.
  8. Sets and set operations; Venn diagrams; laws of sets; cartesian product, counting techniques.

Teaching and Learning Processes

Lectures and tutorial/workshop sessions.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
AssignmentProblem based assignment 115%
AssignmentProblem based assignment 215%
Examination ^End of semester examination70%
ONLINE
TypeDescriptionValue
AssignmentProblem based assignment 115%
AssignmentProblem based assignment 215%
ExaminationEnd of semester examination70%

^ Mandatory to Pass


Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

ENS1161|2|1

School: Engineering

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Computer Fundamentals
  • Unit Code

    ENS1161
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    2
  • Version

    2
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
    Online
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Dr Wlodzimierz GORNISIEWICZ

Description

This unit presents fundamental topics in discrete mathematics that are essential to computing studies including logic, Boolean algebra and logic circuits, set theory, counting techniques, computer arithmetic, graph theory and matrix algebra with applications to computing. It also provides an introduction to the representation of numbers in a computer, and assembly language programming for a microprocessor.

Equivalent Rule

Unit was previously coded ENS4103

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Convert integers and fractions between decimal, octal, binary and hexadecimal number systems; perform simple arithmetic in these systems.
  2. Find sums and products of matrices; apply the algebra of matrices to simple exercises in computer graphics and cryptography.
  3. Identify isomorphic graphs and planar graphs; use matrix representation of graphs; identify Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs.
  4. Represent relations using graphs, ordered pairs and directed graphs; identify equivalence relations; use modular arithmetic; use function notation; identify onto and one-to-one functions; use composition of functions; find the inverse of a function.
  5. Use 2s complement representation of integers; interpret addition operations using CCR flags; perform BCD addition; use ASCII codes.
  6. Use Boolean algebra and Karnaugh maps to simplify Boolean expressions; design, analyse and/or simplify logic circuits.
  7. Use set operations and Venn diagrams; apply elementary counting techniques.
  8. Use the laws of propositional logic to simplify or analyse compound propositions; use truth tables to establish logical equivalence and validity of arguments.

Unit Content

  1. Addition and multiplication of matrices; transpose; zero and identity matrices; laws of matrix algebra; inverse of a square matrix; finding determinant and inverse of 22 matrix; application of matrices to computer graphics and cryptography.
  2. Boolean algebra; logic gates; Karnaugh maps; simplification of Boolean expressions; design and simplification of logic circuits; universality of NANDs.
  3. Computer representation of integers; addition and interpretation using CCR flags; addition of BCD numbers; ASCII code.
  4. Decimal, octal, binary and hexadecimal number systems and conversions of integers and fractions; arithmetic in these systems.
  5. Null and complete graphs, complements; isomorphic graphs; matrix representation of graphs; planar graphs; Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs.
  6. Propositions, connectives and truth tables; logical equivalence; laws of logic; arguments; predicate logic.
  7. Relations and their representations; equivalence relations and classes; modular arithmetic; application to cryptography. Function as process, function as relation; onto and one-to-one functions; composition and inverse functions.
  8. Sets and set operations; Venn diagrams; laws of sets; cartesian product, counting techniques.

Teaching and Learning Processes

Lectures and tutorial/workshop sessions.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
AssignmentProblem based assignment 115%
AssignmentProblem based assignment 215%
Examination ^End of semester examination70%
ONLINE
TypeDescriptionValue
AssignmentProblem based assignment 115%
AssignmentProblem based assignment 215%
ExaminationEnd of semester examination70%

^ Mandatory to Pass


Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

ENS1161|2|2