School: Medical and Health Sciences

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Applied Microbiology
  • Unit Code

    SCH2235
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    1
  • Version

    1
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Dr Megan LLOYD

Description

The major concepts of microbiology are studied with emphasis upon the relationships between humans and microorganisms. The unit covers topics including: the history of microbiology; the morphology of microorganisms; the nature and structure of viruses; the metabolism of microorganisms; microbial nomenclature; sterilisation and disinfection; antimicrobial drugs; hypersensitivity reactions; microbial diseases; food and water microbiology; biotechnology.

Prerequisite Rule

Students must pass 1 unit from SCH1134, SCH1143

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Critically analyse methods used to control the growth of microorganisms, including the prevention of disease due to microorganisms.
  2. Determine the genetic systems in microoganisms and outline at least one major system of gene regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
  3. Evaluate the methods of isolating and observing microorganisms.
  4. Explain the major microorganisms involved in human disease.
  5. Formulate several uses of microorganisms in industry and biotechnology.
  6. Predict the immunological response of humans to microorganisms.
  7. Select the distinguishing features of the major groups of microorganisms, including growth and metabolism.

Unit Content

  1. Classification of microorganisms, criteria for classification and identification, bacterial groups, general characteristics and taxonomy of viruses.
  2. Eukaryotic microorganisms, including algae, slime moulds, fungi, protozoa, helminthes and lichens.
  3. Food and environmental microbiology, prevention of microbial contamination in food, use of microorganisms in food production, microbiology of water and waste water, agricultural microbiology, detoxification of industrial waste and pollution.
  4. Functional anatomy of microorganisms, isolation, staining and observation (microscopy) techniques supported by hands on laboratory sessions on various preparation and staining techniques.
  5. Human microbial disease, illustrated with selected examples of diseases drawn from all major microbial groups in a global context, symbiotic association, principles of epidemiology, clinical microbiology, diagnostic immunology and immunization against microbial disease.
  6. Introduction to microbiology, the diversity and impact of microorganisms on humans around the world.
  7. Mechanisms of immunity including non specific defense mechanisms, host responses during infection, humoral and cell mediated immunity, disorders of the immune system, hypersensitivity, immunodeficiency and autoimmune disease.
  8. Microbial Genetics, regulation of gene expression in bacteria, mutation, genetic exchange and recombination, genetic engineering.
  9. Microbial growth and control, care and nutrition, measurement of growth, physical and chemical control of microbial growth, chemotherapeutics.
  10. Microbial metabolism, chemical reactions and enzymes, biochemical pathways of energy production, carbohydrate catabolism, photosynthesis, nutrition and biosynthesis.

Teaching and Learning Processes

Lectures, laboratory sessions and seminars totalling 5 hours per week. In laboratory sessions students work in pairs or small groups to plan, organize, and conduct experiments over several weeks, and critically analyse their findings.

Each student will be allocated a current research issue in microbiology for investigation using peer-reviewed scientific literature. In seminars, students will present their results to the class, using powerpoint. Guidance on the process of researching scientific literature, and on powerpoint, will be provided early in the unit. Blackboard will be utilised for content delivery.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
PresentationResearch Seminar 25%
TestLaboratory practical assessment25%
ExaminationEnd of semester examination50%

Core Reading(s)

  • Tortora, G. J., Funke, B. R., & Case, C. L. (2010). Microbiology: An introduction (10th ed.). San Francisco, Ca: Pearson Benjamin Cummings.
  • Wiley, J. M., Sherwood, L. M., & Wollverton, C. J. (2017). Prescott's Microbiology (10th ed., pp. xxii, 980). McGraw-Hill.

Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

SCH2235|1|1

School: Medical and Health Sciences

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Applied Microbiology
  • Unit Code

    SCH2235
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    2
  • Version

    1
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Dr Megan LLOYD

Description

The major concepts of microbiology are studied with emphasis upon the relationships between humans and microorganisms. The unit covers topics including: the history of microbiology; the morphology of microorganisms; the nature and structure of viruses; the metabolism of microorganisms; microbial nomenclature; sterilisation and disinfection; antimicrobial drugs; hypersensitivity reactions; microbial diseases; food and water microbiology; biotechnology.

Prerequisite Rule

Students must pass 1 unit from SCH1134, SCH1143

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Critically analyse methods used to control the growth of microorganisms, including the prevention of disease due to microorganisms.
  2. Determine the genetic systems in microoganisms and outline at least one major system of gene regulation in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes.
  3. Evaluate the methods of isolating and observing microorganisms.
  4. Explain the major microorganisms involved in human disease.
  5. Formulate several uses of microorganisms in industry and biotechnology.
  6. Predict the immunological response of humans to microorganisms.
  7. Select the distinguishing features of the major groups of microorganisms, including growth and metabolism.

Unit Content

  1. Classification of microorganisms, criteria for classification and identification, bacterial groups, general characteristics and taxonomy of viruses.
  2. Eukaryotic microorganisms, including algae, slime moulds, fungi, protozoa, helminthes and lichens.
  3. Food and environmental microbiology, prevention of microbial contamination in food, use of microorganisms in food production, microbiology of water and waste water, agricultural microbiology, detoxification of industrial waste and pollution.
  4. Functional anatomy of microorganisms, isolation, staining and observation (microscopy) techniques supported by hands on laboratory sessions on various preparation and staining techniques.
  5. Human microbial disease, illustrated with selected examples of diseases drawn from all major microbial groups in a global context, symbiotic association, principles of epidemiology, clinical microbiology, diagnostic immunology and immunization against microbial disease.
  6. Introduction to microbiology, the diversity and impact of microorganisms on humans around the world.
  7. Mechanisms of immunity including non specific defense mechanisms, host responses during infection, humoral and cell mediated immunity, disorders of the immune system, hypersensitivity, immunodeficiency and autoimmune disease.
  8. Microbial Genetics, regulation of gene expression in bacteria, mutation, genetic exchange and recombination, genetic engineering.
  9. Microbial growth and control, care and nutrition, measurement of growth, physical and chemical control of microbial growth, chemotherapeutics.
  10. Microbial metabolism, chemical reactions and enzymes, biochemical pathways of energy production, carbohydrate catabolism, photosynthesis, nutrition and biosynthesis.

Teaching and Learning Processes

Lectures, laboratory sessions and seminars totalling 5 hours per week. In laboratory sessions students work in pairs or small groups to plan, organize, and conduct experiments over several weeks, and critically analyse their findings.

Each student will be allocated a current research issue in microbiology for investigation using peer-reviewed scientific literature. In seminars, students will present their results to the class, using powerpoint. Guidance on the process of researching scientific literature, and on powerpoint, will be provided early in the unit. Blackboard will be utilised for content delivery.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
PresentationResearch Seminar 25%
TestLaboratory practical assessment25%
ExaminationEnd of semester examination50%

Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

SCH2235|1|2