School: Science

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Case Studies in Science
  • Unit Code

    SCI1182
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    1
  • Version

    1
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
    Online
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Prof Pierre HORWITZ

Description

This unit explores a series of case studies involving the biological, chemical and environmental sciences. The case studies will provide the framework to introduce the sociology and philosophy of science, necessary for the interpretation of environmental and/or technological disputes where different values are represented. Case studies will include societal processes dealing with such matters as genetic engineering, land clearing, resource management, chemical use and population growth.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Analyse a case study involving biological, chemical or environmental matters for its underlying social theme(s),
  2. Demonstrate a broad understanding of the nature of risk as it applies to environmental and technical disputes.
  3. Show a preliminary understanding of the nature of knowledge and the use of data in the context of environmental and/or technical disputes,
  4. Show an ability to detect issues of power, justice and equity in environmental and/or technical disputes,
  5. Show an ability to reflect critically on the role of science and technology in societal processes,

Unit Content

  1. Case studies which have historical importance in the development of environmental movement, or technical innovation, or sustainable development will provide the analytical context to cover the following areas:
  2. Conceptualisations of risk and the precautionary principle,
  3. The cultural practices of science and scientists, peer review, publications, scientific gatherings, scientific authority, science and the media,
  4. The distribution of resources, recognition of advantage and disadvantage, and consideration of class, gender, race and ethnicity in disputes.
  5. The social construction of knowledge and the nature of scientific 'facts',
  6. The use of language in scientific/environmental disputes,

Teaching and Learning Processes

Content and skills will be addressed through the following processes:

Lectures, tutorials, student-centred discussion groups, role playing, self learning.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
PortfolioWorkbook exercises for weekly topics50%
ExerciseTutorial Exercises and quizzes30%
Case StudyMajor assignment20%
ONLINE
TypeDescriptionValue
PortfolioWorkbook exercises for weekly topics50%
ExerciseOnline discussions, tasks and quizzes30%
Case StudyMajor assignment20%

Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

SCI1182|1|1

School: Science

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Case Studies in Science
  • Unit Code

    SCI1182
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    2
  • Version

    1
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
    Online
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Prof Pierre HORWITZ

Description

This unit explores a series of case studies involving the biological, chemical and environmental sciences. The case studies will provide the framework to introduce the sociology and philosophy of science, necessary for the interpretation of environmental and/or technological disputes where different values are represented. Case studies will include societal processes dealing with such matters as genetic engineering, land clearing, resource management, chemical use and population growth.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Analyse a case study involving biological, chemical or environmental matters for its underlying social theme(s),
  2. Demonstrate a broad understanding of the nature of risk as it applies to environmental and technical disputes.
  3. Show a preliminary understanding of the nature of knowledge and the use of data in the context of environmental and/or technical disputes,
  4. Show an ability to detect issues of power, justice and equity in environmental and/or technical disputes,
  5. Show an ability to reflect critically on the role of science and technology in societal processes,

Unit Content

  1. Case studies which have historical importance in the development of environmental movement, or technical innovation, or sustainable development will provide the analytical context to cover the following areas:
  2. Conceptualisations of risk and the precautionary principle,
  3. The cultural practices of science and scientists, peer review, publications, scientific gatherings, scientific authority, science and the media,
  4. The distribution of resources, recognition of advantage and disadvantage, and consideration of class, gender, race and ethnicity in disputes.
  5. The social construction of knowledge and the nature of scientific 'facts',
  6. The use of language in scientific/environmental disputes,

Teaching and Learning Processes

Content and skills will be addressed through the following processes:

Lectures, tutorials, student-centred discussion groups, role playing, self learning.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
PortfolioWorkbook exercises for weekly topics50%
ExerciseTutorial Exercises and quizzes30%
Case StudyMajor assignment20%
ONLINE
TypeDescriptionValue
PortfolioWorkbook exercises for weekly topics50%
ExerciseOnline discussions, tasks and quizzes30%
Case StudyMajor assignment20%

Core Reading(s)

  • Schick, T., & Vaughn, L. (2014). Arguments Good, Bad, and Weird. In How to think about weird things : critical thinking for a new age (pp. 33–61). McGraw Hill.

Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

SCI1182|1|2