School: Science

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Conservation Biology
  • Unit Code

    SCM3201
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    1
  • Version

    2
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Dr Harriet MILLS

Description

This unit critically analyses the scientific basis of conservation practice and applies key biological theories to the special problems encountered in conservation. It deals primarily with the concept of biodiversity, and the application of population, evolutionary and landscape ecologies in conservation management.

Prerequisite Rule

Students must pass 2 units from SCI2116, SCI2117, SCI2118

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Apply the principles of ecological, evolutionary and population genetics to the management of animal and plant populations, introduced or pest species, threatened species and communities, reserves and human impacts upon them.
  2. Critically analyse key biological theories and how they are applied to biodiversity and conservation.
  3. Demonstrate competency in their learning and technical skills, with an emphasis on problem solving skills through experimental design and case study analysis, descriptive statistics, scientific writing, and knowledge of occupational health issues relating to fieldwork.
  4. Design, plan and execute a field study, including logistic arrangements and relevant risk assessments.
  5. Identify, gather, manipulate and interpret key forms of population and species data relevant to conservation practice.
  6. Use key analytical methods and technologies applicable to conservation science.

Unit Content

  1. Choosing strategies and priorities for conservation; In-situ and ex-situ strategies for species management. Landscape ecology, species-area relationships and island biogeography in reserve design. Translocation; captive breeding; close order management and recovery plans.
  2. Concepts and patterns of biodiversity; biodiversity informatics; species definitions; structure and components of populations, metapopulations and communities; methods for measuring diversity, population size and structure and relatedness.
  3. Cultural rights and community-based conservation. Ecosystem health.
  4. Rare species; the nature of threatening processes; exotic and invasive species; climate change; ecosystem fragmentation; identifying threatened species and habitats; extinction and assessing extinction probability using population viability analysis.
  5. The roles of science in conservation; the philosophy of science as it applies to conservation biology; the reasons for conservation and conservation biology; conservation of biological processes.

Teaching and Learning Processes

Lectures, laboratory exercises, field work, workshops.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
AssignmentProject and class presentation25%
Laboratory WorkLaboratory/field portfolio30%
ExaminationEnd of semester examination45%

Core Reading(s)

  • Lindenmeyer, D. B., & M. (2005). Practical conservation biology. Collingwood, Vic., Australia: CSIRO Publishing.

Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

SCM3201|2|1

School: Science

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Conservation Biology
  • Unit Code

    SCM3201
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    2
  • Version

    2
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Dr Harriet MILLS

Description

This unit critically analyses the scientific basis of conservation practice and applies key biological theories to the special problems encountered in conservation. It deals primarily with the concept of biodiversity, and the application of population, evolutionary and landscape ecologies in conservation management.

Prerequisite Rule

Students must pass 2 units from SCI2116, SCI2117, SCI2118

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Apply the principles of ecological, evolutionary and population genetics to the management of animal and plant populations, introduced or pest species, threatened species and communities, reserves and human impacts upon them.
  2. Critically analyse key biological theories and how they are applied to biodiversity and conservation.
  3. Demonstrate competency in their learning and technical skills, with an emphasis on problem solving skills through experimental design and case study analysis, descriptive statistics, scientific writing, and knowledge of occupational health issues relating to fieldwork.
  4. Design, plan and execute a field study, including logistic arrangements and relevant risk assessments.
  5. Identify, gather, manipulate and interpret key forms of population and species data relevant to conservation practice.
  6. Use key analytical methods and technologies applicable to conservation science.

Unit Content

  1. Choosing strategies and priorities for conservation; In-situ and ex-situ strategies for species management. Landscape ecology, species-area relationships and island biogeography in reserve design. Translocation; captive breeding; close order management and recovery plans.
  2. Concepts and patterns of biodiversity; biodiversity informatics; species definitions; structure and components of populations, metapopulations and communities; methods for measuring diversity, population size and structure and relatedness.
  3. Cultural rights and community-based conservation. Ecosystem health.
  4. Rare species; the nature of threatening processes; exotic and invasive species; climate change; ecosystem fragmentation; identifying threatened species and habitats; extinction and assessing extinction probability using population viability analysis.
  5. The roles of science in conservation; the philosophy of science as it applies to conservation biology; the reasons for conservation and conservation biology; conservation of biological processes.

Teaching and Learning Processes

Lectures, laboratory exercises, field work, workshops.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
AssignmentProject and class presentation25%
Laboratory WorkLaboratory/field portfolio30%
ExaminationEnd of semester examination45%

Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

SCM3201|2|2