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Inherent Requirements

Edith Cowan University’s (ECU) School of Education (SoEd) strongly supports the rights of all people who wish to pursue an undergraduate course in initial teacher education at the SoEd to achieve their potential and career objectives. The School is committed to making reasonable adjustments to teaching and learning, assessment, professional experience and other activities to address the impact of students' disabilities so that they are able to participate in their course.

The study and practice of teaching requires respect for diversity, knowledge of theories, legislation, policies and procedures, effective communication, inter-personal, critical thinking and problem solving skills and stamina, to work effectively with children/young people, their families and communities.

Completing a pre-registration course in teacher education enables you to apply for Teacher Registration Board registration in Western Australia.

Course Accreditation and the Standards for Graduate Teachers require the successful completion of a prescribed minimum amount of professional experience in a variety of contexts.

Students, therefore, are required to undertake learning activities over the duration of their course in a range of diverse and complex education and community settings, in diverse environments, which reflect Australian social and educational contexts.

The inherent requirements outlined below provide a guide for students and staff when deciding whether an individual is able to meet these requirements and the type of reasonable adjustments that could be put in place to allow them to complete the course without compromising the academic integrity of the course.

The School is committed to making reasonable adjustments to teaching and learning, assessment, practicum placements and other activities to enable students to participate in their course. Reasonable adjustments must not fundamentally change the nature of the inherent requirement. Students are required to undertake activities which reflect the guidelines as outlined by Australian Institute of Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL). For further information, contact the Associate Dean of your relevant discipline.

The statements are clustered under eight domains consisting of ethical behaviour, behavioural and emotional stability, legal, communication, cognition, sensory abilities, strength and mobility, and sustainable performance.

How to read the Inherent Requirement statements

If you are intending to enrol in an initial teacher registration course with the ECU School of Education, you should look at these Inherent Requirement statements and think about whether you may experience challenges in meeting these requirements.

If you think you may experience challenges in meeting these requirements for any reason, you should discuss your concerns with the coordinator of the course you want to apply for/enrol in or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service. These staff can help you determine reasonable adjustments to assist you to meet the Inherent Requirements. In cases where it is determined that the Inherent Requirements cannot be met with reasonable adjustments, guidance will be provided regarding other study options.

The Inherent Requirements are made up of the following five components and domains:

  • Level 1 – introduction to the Inherent Requirement
  • Level 2 – description of the Inherent Requirement
  • Level 3 – explanation of why this is an Inherent Requirement of pre-registration
  • Level 4 – the nature of any adjustments that may be made to help you meet the Requirement
  • Level 5 – examples of tasks that show you have met the Requirement. These are examples only and are not a comprehensive list.
  1. Introduction
    Teaching and Early Childhood education requires both physical and mental performance at a consistent and sustained level over appropriate times to meet the course outcomes.
  2. Description
    Consistent and sustained level of physical energy to complete a specific task in a timely manner and over time.
    The ability to perform repetitive activities with a level of concentration that ensures a capacity to focus on the activity until it is completed appropriately. The capacity to maintain consistency and quality of performance throughout the designated period of time.
  3. Justification
    Sufficient physical and mental endurance is an essential requirement needed to perform multiple tasks in an assigned period to provide safe and effective care of students and children.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must ensure that performance is consistent and sustained over a given period. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service
  5. Examples
    Preparing for and participating in tutorials, lectures and professional experience.
    Providing consistent supervision, education/instruction and care to children/young people over a negotiated time frame.
    Performing multiple tasks simultaneously whilst supervising the safety and care of children.

This course requires strength and mobility involving fine and gross motor skills.

Gross motor

  1. Introduction
    Teaching and supervising young Children involves physical demands and requires gross motor function.
  2. Description
    Student has the ability to perform gross motor skills to function within scope of practice.
  3. Justification
    Sufficient gross motor skills are necessary to perform and coordinate teaching and learning activities. Tasks that involve gross motor skills include lifting, carrying, pushing, pulling, standing, maintaining balance, twisting and bending. Students must be able to demonstrate and perform these tasks consistently and safely to reduce the risk of harm to self and others.
    It is an AITSL and WA Department of Education requirement that educators are able to undertake many physical tasks and classroom routines.
    Meeting these requirements is necessary for course accreditation and graduate eligibility for registration.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments should facilitate functional effectiveness, safety of self and others and a capacity to provide appropriate care. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
    Setting up safe learning environments with resources and equipment.
    Safely retrieving, moving and using large pieces of equipment.

Fine motor

  1. Introduction
    Teaching and Early Childhood education are professions that require manual dexterity and fine motor skills.
  2. Description
    Student has the ability to use fine motor skills to provide safe and effective education and care of students and children.
  3. Justification
    Sufficient fine motor skills are necessary to perform, coordinate and prioritise care. Tasks that involve fine motor skills include being able to grasp, press, push, turn, squeeze and manipulate various objects and individuals. Students must be able to demonstrate and perform these tasks consistently and safely to reduce the risk of harm to self and others.
    It is requirement that educators are able to undertake many physical tasks and classroom routines. Wording change to include other School systems.
    Meeting these requirements is necessary for course accreditation and graduate eligibility for registration.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments should facilitate functional effectiveness, safety to self and others and a capacity to provide appropriate care. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examles
    Recording, observing, documenting, and clearly modelling the use of equipment such as scissors, pencils and other such equipment.
    Manipulating resources during learning activities.
    Using ICT equipment for teaching and learning.

Visual

  1. Introduction
    Adequate visual acuity is required to provide safe and effective supervision of children and young people in a range of educational and community settings.
  2. Description
    Student has sufficient visual acuity to perform the required range of skills, tasks and assessments.
  3. Justification
    Sufficient visual acuity is necessary to demonstrate the required range of skills, tasks and assessments to maintain consistent, accurate and safe care of self and others. Visual observations, examination and assessment are fundamental to safe and effective Education practice.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must address the need to perform the full range of tasks involved in classroom and early childhood teaching practice. Any strategies to address the effects of the vision impairment must be effective, consistent and not compromise treatment or safety. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
    Providing suitable learning activities.
    Monitoring children and young people's safety, behaviour, health and well-being in indoor and outdoor and engaging in activities at both near and far distances.
    Negotiating unfamiliar settings effectively.
    Manipulating a range of resources.
  1. Introduction

    Interpersonal engagement is essential to work effectively, sensitively and build relationships in community and educational settings.

  2. Description
    Student demonstrates:
    • The ability to work effectively, sensitively and confidentially with children, young people, parents/carers and community members.
    • The ability to create rapport with peers, academic and professional staff conducive to effective working relationships.
  3. Justification
    The Professional Standards for Teachers in Western Australia require effective, sensitive and confidential engagement with students, parents and work colleagues and the ability to engage with people from diverse backgrounds and abilities in various contexts.
    Graduates of accredited courses must meet The Professional Standards for Teachers in Western Australia Standards’ requirements. Inclusion is mandated in the Australian educational context.

    Prior to graduation, students must also successfully complete the LANTITE.

  4. Reasonable adjustments.

    Adjustments must enable appropriate levels of interpersonal engagement and behaviour. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.

  5. Examples
    Participating in a respectful and culturally competent manner in tutorial discussion.
    Collaborating, modifying and reflecting on their teaching during professional and field experience in response to student needs and supervisor feedback.
    Interacting with mutual respect, equity and dignity towards others.

All ECU pre-service teachers and early childhood educators require knowledge of theory and the skills of cognition, literacy and numeracy.

Knowledge and cognitive skills

  1. Introduction
    Consistent knowledge and effective cognitive skills must be demonstrated.
  2. Description
    Student demonstrates:
    • The capacity to locate appropriate and relevant information
    • The ability to process information relevant to practice
    • The ability to integrate and implement knowledge in practice
  3. Justification
    Safe and effective delivery of classroom instruction and early childhood care is based on comprehensive knowledge that must be sourced, understood and applied appropriately.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must ensure that a clear demonstration of knowledge and cognitive skills is not compromised or impeded. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
    Ability to conceptualise and use appropriate knowledge in response to academic assessment items.
    Application of knowledge of policy and procedures in the academic, classroom and early childhood setting.

Literacy (language)

  1. Introduction
    Competent literacy skills are essential for professional and effective delivery of teaching content.
  2. Description
    Student demonstrates:
    • The ability to acquire information and accurately convey appropriate, effective messages
    • The ability to read and comprehend a range of literature and information
    • The capacity to understand and implement academic conventions to construct written text in a scholarly manner
  3. Justification
    The ability to acquire information and to accurately convey messages is fundamental to ensure safe and effective assessment and learning. The ability to read, decode, interpret and comprehend multiple sources of information is fundamental for the safe and effective delivery of teaching/learning experiences in schools and early childhood settings.
    Graduates of accredited courses must meet the Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL) standards.
    Prior to graduation, students must also successfully complete the Literacy and Numeracy Test for Initial Teacher Education (LANTITE).
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must enable a capacity to effectively acquire, comprehend, apply and communicate accurate information. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
    Can demonstrate the ability to listen to and retain information.
    Can demonstrate the ability to convey a spoken message accurately.
    Can demonstrate the ability to paraphrase, summarise and reference in accordance with appropriate academic conventions.

Numeracy

  1. Introduction
    Competent and accurate numeracy skills are essential for effective delivery of teaching content.
  2. Description
    Student demonstrates the ability to interpret and correctly apply data, measurements and numerical criteria in a range of contexts.
  3. Justification
    Competent application of numeracy skills is essential for effective delivery of teaching content.
    Graduates of accredited courses must meet the AITSL standards.
    Prior to graduation, students must also successfully complete the LANTITE.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must enable a capacity to interpret and apply concepts and processes appropriately in a timely, accurate and effective manner. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
    Demonstrating competency in applying basic mathematics knowledge and skills in everyday life and in academic tasks.
    Demonstrating effective use of numeracy skills in matters related to student learning.
    Applying numeracy skills to interpret and solve problems in a range of educational and academic contexts.

Information and Computer Technology (ICT)

  1. Introduction
    Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) are processes and tools that are fundamental to accessing course content, current teaching practice, and pedagogical practice.
  2. Description
    Student demonstrates knowledge of, and confidence in, the use of ICT in academic, professional and curriculum context.
  3. Justification
    Use of ICTs are necessary to provide an effective teaching and learning environment consistent with current pedagogy.
    Meeting these requirements is necessary for course accreditation and graduate eligibility for registration.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must enable the student to demonstrate a capacity to comprehend, interpret and apply ICT. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service
  5. Examples
    Utilising appropriate ICTs to communicate with peers and lecturers and to gather information in accomplishing academic tasks.
    Using ICTs for accurate, responsive and diligent reports, student profiles, record keeping, lesson presentation material, curriculum plans, assessment and evaluations.
    Using written texts and email professionally at university and during professional experience with students, children, staff, parents and the community.

Interpersonal Engagement

  1. Introduction
    Interpersonal engagement is essential to work effectively, sensitively and build relationships in community and educational settings.
  2. Description
    Student demonstrates:
    • The ability to work effectively, sensitively and confidentially with children, young people, parents/carers and community members.
    • The ability to create rapport with peers, academic and professional staff conducive to effective working relationships.
  3. Justification
    The Professional Standards for Teachers in Western Australia require effective, sensitive and confidential engagement with students, parents and work colleagues and the ability to engage with people from diverse backgrounds and abilities in various contexts.
    Graduates of accredited courses must meet The Professional Standards for Teachers in Western Australia Standards’ requirements. Inclusion is mandated in the Australian educational context.
    Prior to graduation, students must also successfully complete the LANTITE.
  4. Reasonable adjustments.
    Adjustments must enable appropriate levels of interpersonal engagement and behaviour. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
    Participating in a respectful and culturally competent manner in tutorial discussion.
    Collaborating, modifying and reflecting on their teaching during professional and field experience in response to student needs and supervisor feedback.
    Interacting with mutual respect, equity and dignity towards others.

All ECU pre-service teachers require effective verbal, non-verbal, aural and written communication skills.

Verbal

  1. Introduction
    Effective verbal communication in English is essential.
  2. Description
    Student demonstrates:
    • Effective verbal communication at formal and informal levels in tutorials, with peers and lecturers/tutors in small and large groups.
    • The ability to provide clear instructions and presentation of ideas to individuals and large groups relevant to the learning context.
    • The capacity to use verbal language in a range of different social situations with children and adults during professional and field experience.
    • The ability to communicate effectively with diverse linguistic and cultural groups and individuals across a range of social contexts.
    • The capacity to use a range of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) that support verbal communication with individuals, small groups and whole classes for learning and assessment purposes and during professional and field experience.
  3. Justification
    Verbal communication is the primary medium of communication in an educational setting.
    Timely, accurate, clear and effective delivery of information provides clear instruction and initiation of learning. Interactivity of communication is fundamental to the educational process.
    Adequate verbal communication is essential in developing and maintaining effective relationships with all educational stakeholders.
    Graduates of accredited courses must meet the Professional Standards for Teachers in Western Australia
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must enable verbal communication with clarity and accuracy that facilitates effective communication and safety. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
    Communicating in English effectively and appropriately in tutorials, lectures and on professional and field experience.
    Demonstrating knowledge and use of ICTs such as data projectors, computers and DVDs to support oral communication for tutorial presentations and small group presentations on professional and field experience.

Non-verbal

  1. Introduction
    Effective non-verbal communication is fundamental to educational settings and needs to be respectful, clear, attentive, empathetic, honest and non-judgmental.
  2. Description
    Student demonstrates:
    • The capacity to recognise, interpret and respond appropriately to behavioural cues and gestures;
    • Consistent and appropriate awareness of own behaviours; and
    • Sensitivity to individual and/or cultural differences.
  3. Justification
    The ability to observe and understand non-verbal cues assists with building rapport with people and gaining their trust and respect, which is required in academic and professional relationships. Displaying consistent and appropriate facial expressions, eye contact, being mindful of space, time boundaries, body movements and gestures, also promotes this trust and respect. The ability to observe and understand non-verbal cues is also essential for the safe and effective observation of students in and outside the classroom and early childhood environments, particularly in situations where their students may not be able to verbalise distress, discomfort or fear. For children who do not talk or use verbal language their gestures and cues are their main communication tool.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must enable the recognition, initiation of or appropriate response to effective non-verbal communication in a timely and appropriate manner. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
    Recognising non-verbal cues and responding appropriately in tutorials and seminars.
    Recognising non-verbal cues and responding appropriately in professional and field experience settings.
    Displaying appropriate non-verbal gestures in classroom situations and professional and field experience settings.

Aural

  1. Introduction
    Competent aural communication is required to effectively access course content and be responsive to the demands of professional and field experience.
  2. Description
    Student has sufficient aural function to undertake the required range of tasks.
    Active listening in tutorials and lectures with tutors, lecturers and peers and during professional and field experience with families and children.
    Appropriate use of ICTs that support aural communication with individuals and small groups for learning and assessment purposes and during professional and field experience, such as audio-visual equipment and mobile phones and technologies.
  3. Justification
    Sufficient auditory ability is necessary to monitor, assess and manage an individual's learning needs consistently and accurately. Auditory assessments and observations are fundamental to safe and effective classroom and early childhood teaching practice.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must address the need to perform the full range of tasks involved in classroom and early childhood teaching environments and practice. Any strategies to address the effects of the hearing loss must be effective, consistent and not compromise treatment or safety. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
    Providing suitable learning activities for the hearing impaired.
  6. Demonstrating knowledge and use of ICTs that rely on effective aural communication for tutorial presentations and small group presentations on professional and field experience.
    Responding effectively to children and adults, demonstrating empathy towards and active listening to what is being communicated.

Written

  1. Introduction
    Effective written communication in English is a fundamental requirement to effectively access course content and participate in professional and field experience.
  2. Description
    The student must be able to demonstrate:
    • The capacity to locate appropriate and relevant information;
    • The ability to process information relevant to practice;
    • The ability to integrate, reflect on and implement theoretical knowledge in tutorials, professional and field experience settings; and
    • The capacity to construct coherent written communication appropriate to the circumstances.
  3. Justification
    Construction of written text based assessment tasks to reflect the required academic standards are necessary to convey knowledge and understanding of relevant subject matter for professional practice. Accurate written communication, including record-keeping and student notes, is vital to provide a consistent and safe learning environment.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must enable the ability to meet necessary standards of clarity, accuracy and accessibility to ensure effective recording and transmission of information in both academic and educational settings. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
  6. Constructing written assignments that comply with academic standards.
    Conveying information in a written form effectively to families or other staff in the educational setting.
    Identifying and applying knowledge of policy and procedures during professional and field experience settings
  1. Introduction
    Graduate Teacher Standards are mandated by legislation and regulations to comply with professional accreditation, registration and professional and field experience requirements.
  2. Description
    Students demonstrate knowledge and compliance with Australian law, professional regulations and standards relevant to persons working with children, young people and their families, and those who dictate the scope of teaching.
  3. Justification
    Knowledge, understanding and compliance with legislative and regulatory requirements are necessary pre-requisites to practicum placements in order to reduce the risk of harm to self and others. Compliance with these professional regulations and the Australian law ensures that students are both responsible and accountable for their practice.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must be consistent with legislative and regulatory requirements. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
    Complying with the requirement for Working with Children Checks and National Police History Check.
    Student has no criminal charges or convictions, which may place children, co-workers, or members of the public, at risk, or which may otherwise affect their ability to teach in a school or education centre. Student otherwise meets the criteria of being a fit and proper person, pursuant to section 24 of the Teacher Registration Act 2012 (Act).
    Complying with relevant child protection and other safety legislation.
    Adhering to requirements of informed consent, privacy and confidentiality with organisational, family and child information in academic and education settings.
  1. Introduction
    Behavioural and emotional stability is required to function and adapt sensitively in educational settings.
  2. Description
    Student demonstrates behavioural and emotional stability to work constructively in a diverse and changing academic, classroom and early childhood environment.
  3. Justification
    Behavioural and emotional stability is required to work individually and in teams in changing and unpredictable environments. Pre-service teachers may be exposed to complex, stressful situations and will be required to have behavioural and emotional stability to manage these objectively and professionally.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must support stable, effective and professional behaviour in both academic and clinical settings. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
    Being receptive and responding appropriately to constructive feedback.
    Coping with own emotions and behaviour effectively when dealing with individuals in the community and educational settings.
  1. Introduction
    Education professions are governed by competency standards, codes of ethics, professional conduct expectations and professional boundaries where teachers are both accountable and responsible for ensuring professional behaviour in all contexts. These documents are available for review via the Professional Standards for Teachers.
  2. Description
    Student demonstrates knowledge of, and engages in ethical behaviour in practice.
  3. Justification
    Compliance with the standards, codes, guidelines and policies, facilitates safe, competent interactions and relationships for students and/or the people with whom they engage. This supports the physical, psychological, emotional and spiritual wellbeing of all.
  4. Reasonable adjustments
    Adjustments must ensure the standards, codes, guidelines and policies are not compromised or result in unethical behaviour. Adjustments specific to the individual can be discussed with the course coordinator and/or the ECU Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service.
  5. Examples
    Demonstrating respect for the diversity of family and community values and practices within academic, professional and field experience settings.
    Complying with privacy and confidentiality requirements in academic, professional and field experience settings.
    Demonstrating honesty and integrity in academic, professional and field experience settings.

This content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Con Commercial Share Alike 4.0 International licence.

This content has been reproduced and modified based on materials published by the University of Western Sydney: Inherent Requirements © University of Western Sydney is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial Share Alike 4.0 International licence.

Acknowledgement: Johnson, A., Allan,T., Phillips,K., Azzopardi,T., Dickson,C., Goldsmith,M & Hengstberger-Sims, C. (2011). Inherent Requirements of Nursing Education (IRONE), University of Western Sydney (UWS) School of Nursing & Midwifery and UWS Student Equity & Disability Services, used to form the UWS Inherent Requirements 

All subsequent dealings with this work pursuant to the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial Share Alike 4.0 International licence must contain the same form of attribution as above and acknowledge Edith Cowan University School of Education.

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