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Training Load Quantification in Elite Australian Basketball and the Use of the Reactive Strength Index as a Valid Performance Measure

The determination of training load in team sport is an essential component in athletic preparation. Quantification of the athlete’s internal response and the prescribed external load is required to ensure an individual’s load tolerance does not negatively impact the desired performance outcome. Several indices of training load have been devised to measure both internal and external loads in team sports. For example sessional ratings of perceived exertion (sRPE) are often used to quantify internal load while volume load (VL) is often used to measure the external training loads associated with resistance training. Furthermore performance tests involving jumping tasks such as the reactive strength index (RSI) have been incorporated in elite sport to assess the athletes’ response to the prescribed training load. Conceptually such tests could provide a representation of the interaction between the internal physiological and external performance responses associated with training and assist coaches in directing training practices. Recently, this interplay has been a research focus for many professional sports, however to our knowledge no such research has examined this concept in professional men’s basketball in Australia.

Therefore, the aims of the proposed thesis are to: i) Quantify the training components of an elite Australian basketball team including internal and external measures of training load. ii) Determine whether sessional ratings of perceived exertion (sRPE) are a valid method of training load quantification in elite basketball. iii) Evaluate the reactive strength index to determine if it is sensitive to changes in training load.

Project duration

2014-2015


Researchers

Mr William Markwick
Associate Professor Greg Haff
Charles Sturt University (Aus), Dr Stephan Bird

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