Top of page
Global Site Navigation

Electron Science Research Institute

Local Section Navigation

Help us improve our content by rating this page.

Page rating system

Please leave a comment about your rating so we can better understand how we might improve the page.

You are here: Main Content

Ultra-high speed infrared light modulators and magneto-optic light controllers for telecommunications industry

At the Electron Science Research Institute, we aim to develop practical demonstration and development of ultra-fast next-generation polarisation controllers and light intensity modulators suitable for various applications in the telecommunications industry.

The core technology to be used for the development of these novel devices is based on custom-designed tunable magnetic photonic crystals (MPC) fabricated using RF magnetron sputtering of bismuth-doped iron garnet compounds with high magneto-optic quality.

The research team at the Institute has so far established a solid track record and a significant expertise base in the areas of magneto-optic materials and magnetic photonic crystals, including both the theoretical analysis and practical manufacturing.

We intend to design and manufacture MPC structures with enhanced Faraday rotation at the communications-band wavelengths. Our materials’ magneto-optic quality factors at these wavelengths are very high, allowing to predict the ability to completely control the plane-polarised source light by means of achieving Faraday rotation angles of up to ±30-45º when the light is transmitted through a 1D photonic crystal of only 3-5 microns thickness.

The devices will feature ultra-fast (nanoseconds-range) switching response, allowing to quickly set either the polarisation plane direction or the intensity of laser light propagated through the controller, using electronic driving circuits.

This functionality will open up new ways of modulating light from communications-band sources in either intensity or polarisation state, which will be useful for front-end equipment in industrial optical communications systems, as well as for designing novel lightwave measurement and control systems.


Researchers

Dr Mikhail Vasiliev
Professor Kamal Alameh
Mohammad Nur-E-Alam

Skip to top of page