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How we’re using hi-tech glass to power the buildings of the future


Innovative nanotechnology is being used by ECU researchers to turn windows into ‘energy harvesting clear glass’ to help create the green buildings of tomorrow.
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Solar glass greenhouses could soon be springing up all over the world thanks to technology developed at ECU.

Innovative nanotechnology is being used by ECU researchers to turn windows into ‘energy harvesting clear glass’ to help create the green buildings of tomorrow.

Innovative nanotechnology is being used by ECU researchers to turn windows into ‘energy harvesting clear glass’ to help create the green buildings of tomorrow.

Nanotechonology developed by the ECU's Electron Science Research Institute and ClearVue Technologies could provide all the power necessary to run a building of the future.

Energy harvesting clear glass lets visible light through but generates power via solar cells by blocking the ultraviolet and infrared light from the sun.

Professor Kamal Alameh believes the glass could be used to power self-sustainable or net zero energy buildings.

His team received a $1.6 million grant from the Federal Government's Cooperative Research Centre program.

The grant will be used to build a 300sqm greenhouse using transparent glass that can generate 50 watts of power per square metre of surface area.

Visit the Electron Science Research Institute website for more information.

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