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Australia’s seagrasses and how they are helping us to fight global climate change

Professor Paul Lavery
Director of ECU’s Centre for Marine Ecosystem Research and Professor of Marine Ecology in the School of Science

Date: Wednesday, 7 June, 2017
Time: Event commences 4.00pm sharp. Refreshments from 5.00pm to 6.00pm.
Venue: Building 32 Lecture Theatre, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup Campus, 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup

This lecture will introduce the audience to Australia’s rich seagrass heritage and explore its important role in capturing atmospheric carbon.

Unknown to many of us, Australia is blessed with some of the most diverse and extensive seagrass ecosystems on the planet. They are among the most effective ecosystems at capturing carbon from the atmosphere.

Paul Lavery, Director of the Centre for Marine Ecosystem Research and Professor of Marine Ecology in ECU's School of Science, will explore the important part these ecosystems play in helping us to adapt to global climate change.

Background

Paul Lavery is the Director of ECU’s Centre for Marine Ecosystem Research and Professor of Marine Ecology in the School of Science.

Much of his 30 years of research has been spent understanding how seagrass ecosystems work, and how we can better manage our impacts on them. Committed to ensuring that research informs better management of our environment, Paul has engaged strongly with government and industry.

Professor Lavery has participated in national and international programs examining the impacts of human activity on seagrass ecosystems, helped to established WA’s first seagrass monitoring programme for Cockburn Sound and advised the government on national water quality guidelines.

Since 2010 he has worked on ‘Blue-Carbon’, the carbon dioxide scavenged from the atmosphere and locked away in seagrass and other coastal ecosystems, publishing the first estimate of Australia’s seagrass Blue-Carbon reserves and advising the Commonwealth government on how to incorporate this into carbon crediting schemes. He currently leads the WA Marine Science Institution’s research program on the impacts of dredging on seagrasses.

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