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Overview

The School of Medical Sciences is home to learning and research in medical, biomedical and paramedical science. We strive for health improvement through the application of new knowledge and excellence in teaching and research.

ECU's new Bachelor of Medical Science degree commenced in Semester 1 2013, it is a three-year course providing pathways to medicine and other health professions, medical research and diagnostics, and the health industry.

Student testimonials

Meghann Laverty Thumbnail

"I wanted the opportunity to work anywhere in Australia as well as overseas."

Meghann Laverty

ECU Paramedical Science student

Research activity

Our areas of research strength are in the neurosciences with a focus on Alzheimer’s disease, Huntington’s disease and Parkinson’s disease, reproductive technology, genetics and cancer with a focus on melanoma. We value research into learning and teaching, clinical practice, simulation, inter-professional practice and health systems with a focus on workforce development.

News & events

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Depression linked to Alzheimer’s disease

Researchers have found a strong link between depression and cognitive decline which could pave the way for new treatment options for dementia.

Funds raised will help secure state-of-the-art equipment for the ECU Melanoma Research Group, lead by Professor Mel Ziman. Thumbnail

Mission Impossible screening – In support of Melanoma Research

Support Melanoma Research by purchasing a ticket to see a special screening of the latest Mission Impossible movie at Event Cinemas Innaloo on Monday, 10 August 2015.

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Shedding light on myopia

A major study has revealed that more than four out of five Chinese students suffer from myopia and researchers warn Australia could see similar rates of short sightedness in the future.

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