School: Science

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Chemistry for the Life Sciences
  • Unit Code

    SCC1123
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    1
  • Version

    2
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Dr Magdalena WAJRAK

Description

This broadly based unit will introduce the student to important chemical concepts and principles. The unit will provide the essential chemistry background required for courses in the biological, environmental and health sciences. A chemistry ATAR background is not assumed.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Explain and apply basic concepts, principles and theories in chemistry, eg. the application of acid-base theory to explain the use of buffers in biological systems.
  2. Identify and describe applications of chemistry in the life sciences. For example, the importance of hydrogen bonding in biology, how ozone depletion occurs and the formation of acid rain.
  3. Name and recognise elements, compounds and polyatomic ions, and write and balance chemical equations.
  4. Perform calculations relating to percentage composition, gases, solutions, reaction stoichiometry, Kw, pH.
  5. Understand and be able to explain important chemical laboratory skills (e.g. collection of oxygen, hydrogen and carbon dioxide gases) and analytical techniques (e.g. titrations).

Unit Content

  1. Common aqueous solutions, concentration of solutions; relationship between moles, concentration and volumes of solutions; electrolyte solutions: relationship to conductivity and special properties of water, water salinity and hardness.
  2. Definitions of acids, bases, salts, neutralisation and pH; titrations calculations and importance of buffer solutions; oxidation and reduction in terms of electron transfer, predicting reaction tendencies and introduction to electrochemistry.
  3. Energy changes accompanying chemical reactions, rates of reaction, factors affecting reaction rate; equilibria in chemical reactions and equilibrium processes, factors that influence chemical equilibria (ie. Le Chatelier's principle).
  4. Properties of common gases (ie. oxygen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide) and their biological and industrial importance, gas laws, and atmospheric pollution.
  5. The building blocks of matter: definitions of elements, compounds, mixtures and solutions, molecules and ions; the structure of atom, electron configuration and the periodic table; the mole concept, writing and balancing equations.
  6. Types of chemical bonding, forces between molecules and relationship between bonding and properties.

Teaching and Learning Processes

Lectures, e-tutorials (online web learning OWL), individual and group based laboratory work, maths thrival workshop and unit website activities.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

Due to the professional competency skill development associated with this Unit, student attendance/participation within listed in-class activities and/or online activities including discussion boards is compulsory. Students failing to meet participation standards as outlined in the unit plan may be awarded an I Grade (Fail - incomplete). Students who are unable to meet this requirement for medical or other reasons must seek the approval of the unit coordinator.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
TestMid-Semester Test (Short Answer Questions and Calculations)20%
ExaminationEnd of Semester Examination40%
Laboratory WorkLaboratory Experimental Write-ups 30%
Exercisee-Tutorials10%

Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

SCC1123|2|1

School: Science

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Chemistry for the Life Sciences
  • Unit Code

    SCC1123
  • Year

    2017
  • Enrolment Period

    2
  • Version

    2
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery

    On Campus
  • Unit Co-ordinator

    Dr Magdalena WAJRAK

Description

This broadly based unit will introduce the student to important chemical concepts and principles. The unit will provide the essential chemistry background required for courses in the biological, environmental and health sciences. A chemistry ATAR background is not assumed.

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Explain and apply basic concepts, principles and theories in chemistry, eg. the application of acid-base theory to explain the use of buffers in biological systems.
  2. Identify and describe applications of chemistry in the life sciences. For example, the importance of hydrogen bonding in biology, how ozone depletion occurs and the formation of acid rain.
  3. Name and recognise elements, compounds and polyatomic ions, and write and balance chemical equations.
  4. Perform calculations relating to percentage composition, gases, solutions, reaction stoichiometry, Kw, pH.
  5. Understand and be able to explain important chemical laboratory skills (e.g. collection of oxygen, hydrogen and carbon dioxide gases) and analytical techniques (e.g. titrations).

Unit Content

  1. Common aqueous solutions, concentration of solutions; relationship between moles, concentration and volumes of solutions; electrolyte solutions: relationship to conductivity and special properties of water, water salinity and hardness.
  2. Definitions of acids, bases, salts, neutralisation and pH; titrations calculations and importance of buffer solutions; oxidation and reduction in terms of electron transfer, predicting reaction tendencies and introduction to electrochemistry.
  3. Energy changes accompanying chemical reactions, rates of reaction, factors affecting reaction rate; equilibria in chemical reactions and equilibrium processes, factors that influence chemical equilibria (ie. Le Chatelier's principle).
  4. Properties of common gases (ie. oxygen, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide) and their biological and industrial importance, gas laws, and atmospheric pollution.
  5. The building blocks of matter: definitions of elements, compounds, mixtures and solutions, molecules and ions; the structure of atom, electron configuration and the periodic table; the mole concept, writing and balancing equations.
  6. Types of chemical bonding, forces between molecules and relationship between bonding and properties.

Teaching and Learning Processes

Lectures, e-tutorials (online web learning OWL), individual and group based laboratory work, maths thrival workshop and unit website activities.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

Due to the professional competency skill development associated with this Unit, student attendance/participation within listed in-class activities and/or online activities including discussion boards is compulsory. Students failing to meet participation standards as outlined in the unit plan may be awarded an I Grade (Fail - incomplete). Students who are unable to meet this requirement for medical or other reasons must seek the approval of the unit coordinator.

ON CAMPUS
TypeDescriptionValue
TestMid-Semester Test (Short Answer Questions and Calculations)20%
ExaminationEnd of Semester Examination40%
Laboratory WorkLaboratory Experimental Write-ups 30%
Exercisee-Tutorials10%

Core Reading(s)

  • Joesten, M., Hogg, J., & Wajrak, M. (2012). SCC1123, Chemistry for the Life Sciences . Melbourne, Australia: Cengage Learning.

Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

SCC1123|2|2