Faculty of Education and Arts

School: Communications and Arts

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Children, Fiction and Hypermedia
  • Unit Code

    ENG3467
  • Year

    2015
  • Enrolment Period

    1
  • Version

    1
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery


Description

Fiction and hypermedia written for children today cover topics which society would not have dreamed of giving to children in the past. This unit focuses on the ways in which those topics have been represented in some of the major sub-genres of recent childrens literature. The unit is concerned with recent changes regarding the notion of literature, and discusses developments in approaches to language, culture, the writer, and the reader.

Non Standard Timetable Requirements

Online.

Equivalent Rule

Unit was previously coded ENG2257, ENG3157, ENG3357, ENG4467

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Analyse the major thematic concerns of selected recent children's books.
  2. Compare the developments in children's literature, especially hypermedia, to recent changes in approaches to language, narrative and literature.
  3. Discuss developments in approaches to language, culture, the writer, and the reader in recent childrens literature.
  4. Discuss the major psychological and social issues represented in a cross-section of modern children's literature.
  5. Identify a number of genres, modes and conventions of literary texts about and for children.

Unit Content

  1. A critical study of works belonging to the sub-genres of the realistic Problem novel, the Picture Book, and the Post-Modern or manifold childrens narrative.
  2. A survey of the developments in notions of childhood from the late twentieth century.
  3. An appraisal of modern concepts of narrative, including the use of realism, history, intertextuality, intermodality, hypermedia, interactivity and language.
  4. An exploration of the historical, cultural and psychological issues raised by the selected works.

Additional Learning Experience Information

Online.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ONLINE
TypeDescriptionValue
AssignmentEssay on some aspect of modern children's literature or short story/hypermedia creative response40%
ExerciseLeading Discussion Board20%
ExaminationExamination40%

Text References

  • ^ Naylor, P.R. (2000). Jade Green: A ghost story.
  • ^ Myers, W.D. (2001). 145th street stories.
  • ^ Jones, E.P. (2006). All Aunt Hagar's children. Digital Book: Harper Collins.
  • ^ Dahl, R. (1964). Charlie and the chocolate factory.
  • ^ Colfer, E. (2008). The time paradox.
  • ^ Cannon, J. (1993). Stellaluna.
  • ^ Paolini, C. (2005). Eldest.
  • ^ Zindel, P. (1968). The pigman.
  • ^ Schwarz, D.J. (2008). Superpowers.
  • ^ Radin, R.Y. (2000). Escape to the forest: Based on a true story of the Holocaust.
  • ^ Petersen, P.J. (2000). I hate weddings.
  • ^ Peters, J.A. (2000). Define "normal".
  • ^ Paterson, K. (1978). Bridge to Terabithia.
  • ^ Adler, C.S. (1999). Winning.
  • Natov, R. (2003). The poetics of childhood. New York: Routledge.
  • Lucas, A.L. (Ed.). (2003). The presence of the past in children's literature. Westport: Greenwood.
  • Lahey, G. (Ed.). (2006). The translation of children's literature: A reader. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.
  • Cullinam, B.E. & Person, D.G. (Eds.). (2003). The continuum encyclopedia of children's literature. New York: Continuum.
  • Chapleau, S. (2004). New voices in children's literature criticism. Lichfield: Pied Piper.
  • Briggs, J., & Grendy, M.O. (Eds.). (2008). Popular children's literature in Britain. Aldershot: Ashgate.
  • Avery, G., & Reynolds, K. (Eds.). (2000). Representations of childhood death. London: Macmillan.
  • Nodelman, P., & Reimer, M. (2003). The pleasures of children's literature. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
  • Pena de Carrillo, I. (2008). Adaptive and assisted educational hypermedia. Saarbrucken: VDM Verlag Dr Muller.
  • Pullinger, K. (2008). Digital fiction: From the page to the screen. Berlin and Heidelberg: Springer Verlag.
  • Thacker, D.C., & Webb, J. (2002). Introducing children's literature: From romanticism to postmodernism. London: Routledge.
  • Reynolds, K. (2004). Modern children's literature: An introduction. Basingstoke: Palgrave-Macmillan.
  • Zipes, J. (Ed.). (2005). The Norton anthology of children's literature: The traditions in English.
  • Thompson, M.S., & Coghlan, V. (Eds.). (2007). Divided worlds: Studies in children's literature. Dublin: Four Courts Press.

Journal References

  • The Lion and the Unicorn.
  • VOYA.
  • Teaching Children's Literature: Issues, Pedagogy, Resources.
  • Signal.
  • Orana.
  • Horn Book Magazine.
  • Mangen, A. (2008, December). Storybooks on paper better for children than reading fiction on computer screen. Science Daily.
  • Mott, M.S., Etsler, C., & Drumgold, D. (2003). Applying an analytic writing rubric to children's hypermedia "narratives". Early Childhood Research & Practice. 5
  • Children's Literature Association Quarterly.
  • Children's Literature in Education.
  • Children's Literature: An International Journal.
  • E-Learning.

Website References

^ Mandatory reference


Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

ENG3467|1|1

Faculty of Education and Arts

School: Communications and Arts

This unit information may be updated and amended immediately prior to semester. To ensure you have the correct outline, please check it again at the beginning of semester.

  • Unit Title

    Children, Fiction and Hypermedia
  • Unit Code

    ENG3467
  • Year

    2015
  • Enrolment Period

    2
  • Version

    1
  • Credit Points

    15
  • Full Year Unit

    N
  • Mode of Delivery


Description

Fiction and hypermedia written for children today cover topics which society would not have dreamed of giving to children in the past. This unit focuses on the ways in which those topics have been represented in some of the major sub-genres of recent childrens literature. The unit is concerned with recent changes regarding the notion of literature, and discusses developments in approaches to language, culture, the writer, and the reader.

Non Standard Timetable Requirements

Online.

Equivalent Rule

Unit was previously coded ENG2257, ENG3157, ENG3357, ENG4467

Learning Outcomes

On completion of this unit students should be able to:

  1. Analyse the major thematic concerns of selected recent children's books.
  2. Compare the developments in children's literature, especially hypermedia, to recent changes in approaches to language, narrative and literature.
  3. Discuss developments in approaches to language, culture, the writer, and the reader in recent childrens literature.
  4. Discuss the major psychological and social issues represented in a cross-section of modern children's literature.
  5. Identify a number of genres, modes and conventions of literary texts about and for children.

Unit Content

  1. A critical study of works belonging to the sub-genres of the realistic Problem novel, the Picture Book, and the Post-Modern or manifold childrens narrative.
  2. A survey of the developments in notions of childhood from the late twentieth century.
  3. An appraisal of modern concepts of narrative, including the use of realism, history, intertextuality, intermodality, hypermedia, interactivity and language.
  4. An exploration of the historical, cultural and psychological issues raised by the selected works.

Additional Learning Experience Information

Online.

Assessment

GS1 GRADING SCHEMA 1 Used for standard coursework units

Students please note: The marks and grades received by students on assessments may be subject to further moderation. All marks and grades are to be considered provisional until endorsed by the relevant Board of Examiners.

ONLINE
TypeDescriptionValue
AssignmentEssay on some aspect of modern children's literature or short story/hypermedia creative response40%
ExerciseLeading Discussion Board20%
ExaminationExamination40%

Text References

  • ^ Naylor, P.R. (2000). Jade Green: A ghost story.
  • ^ Myers, W.D. (2001). 145th street stories.
  • ^ Jones, E.P. (2006). All Aunt Hagar's children. Digital Book: Harper Collins.
  • ^ Dahl, R. (1964). Charlie and the chocolate factory.
  • ^ Colfer, E. (2008). The time paradox.
  • ^ Cannon, J. (1993). Stellaluna.
  • ^ Paolini, C. (2005). Eldest.
  • ^ Zindel, P. (1968). The pigman.
  • ^ Schwarz, D.J. (2008). Superpowers.
  • ^ Radin, R.Y. (2000). Escape to the forest: Based on a true story of the Holocaust.
  • ^ Petersen, P.J. (2000). I hate weddings.
  • ^ Peters, J.A. (2000). Define "normal".
  • ^ Paterson, K. (1978). Bridge to Terabithia.
  • ^ Adler, C.S. (1999). Winning.
  • Natov, R. (2003). The poetics of childhood. New York: Routledge.
  • Lucas, A.L. (Ed.). (2003). The presence of the past in children's literature. Westport: Greenwood.
  • Lahey, G. (Ed.). (2006). The translation of children's literature: A reader. Clevedon: Multilingual Matters.
  • Cullinam, B.E. & Person, D.G. (Eds.). (2003). The continuum encyclopedia of children's literature. New York: Continuum.
  • Chapleau, S. (2004). New voices in children's literature criticism. Lichfield: Pied Piper.
  • Briggs, J., & Grendy, M.O. (Eds.). (2008). Popular children's literature in Britain. Aldershot: Ashgate.
  • Avery, G., & Reynolds, K. (Eds.). (2000). Representations of childhood death. London: Macmillan.
  • Nodelman, P., & Reimer, M. (2003). The pleasures of children's literature. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
  • Pena de Carrillo, I. (2008). Adaptive and assisted educational hypermedia. Saarbrucken: VDM Verlag Dr Muller.
  • Pullinger, K. (2008). Digital fiction: From the page to the screen. Berlin and Heidelberg: Springer Verlag.
  • Thacker, D.C., & Webb, J. (2002). Introducing children's literature: From romanticism to postmodernism. London: Routledge.
  • Reynolds, K. (2004). Modern children's literature: An introduction. Basingstoke: Palgrave-Macmillan.
  • Zipes, J. (Ed.). (2005). The Norton anthology of children's literature: The traditions in English.
  • Thompson, M.S., & Coghlan, V. (Eds.). (2007). Divided worlds: Studies in children's literature. Dublin: Four Courts Press.

Journal References

  • The Lion and the Unicorn.
  • VOYA.
  • Teaching Children's Literature: Issues, Pedagogy, Resources.
  • Signal.
  • Orana.
  • Horn Book Magazine.
  • Mangen, A. (2008, December). Storybooks on paper better for children than reading fiction on computer screen. Science Daily.
  • Mott, M.S., Etsler, C., & Drumgold, D. (2003). Applying an analytic writing rubric to children's hypermedia "narratives". Early Childhood Research & Practice. 5
  • Children's Literature Association Quarterly.
  • Children's Literature in Education.
  • Children's Literature: An International Journal.
  • E-Learning.

Website References

^ Mandatory reference


Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005)

For the purposes of considering a request for Reasonable Adjustments under the Disability Standards for Education (Commonwealth 2005), inherent requirements for this subject are articulated in the Unit Description, Learning Outcomes and Assessment Requirements of this entry. The University is dedicated to provide support to those with special requirements. Further details on the support for students with disabilities or medical conditions can be found at the Student Equity, Diversity and Disability Service website.

Academic Misconduct

Edith Cowan University has firm rules governing academic misconduct and there are substantial penalties that can be applied to students who are found in breach of these rules. Academic misconduct includes, but is not limited to:

  • plagiarism;
  • unauthorised collaboration;
  • cheating in examinations;
  • theft of other students’ work;

Additionally, any material submitted for assessment purposes must be work that has not been submitted previously, by any person, for any other unit at ECU or elsewhere.

The ECU rules and policies governing all academic activities, including misconduct, can be accessed through the ECU website.

ENG3467|1|2